17 Places All Irish People Should Visit In Ireland Before They Die

Why spend huge money on a fancy holiday when you have all this on your doorstep


There is a good reason why so many people come to visit Ireland from abroad...the place is absolutely stunning. Living here however you tend to lose sight of the fact that some of these incredible places are only ever a couple of hours drive away at most.

Check through the list and seen how many you've been to and if the list isn't complete you better get cracking because you really are missing out...

1.Roundstone, Connemara

This Connemara village is beautifully set on one of the most spectacular coastal drives in Ireland overlooking the Atlantic at the foot of Errisbeg Mountain.

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Just about as far West as you can travel in Ireland but once you get here it is like stepping into a postcard. Great food, lots of activities and the evergreen dolphin make this a must visit.

3.Dunmore East

Whether it's the sea air or the relaxed holiday vibe that does it, one thing is for sure, the people of Dunmore East, County Waterford are a happy bunch. Great vibes here.

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4.The Aran Islands

Highlight of the Wild Atlantic Way with it's Cliffs and spectacular coastal views, The Aran Islands (Islands of Saints and Scholars) is located just off Galway in the Atlantic. A true Irish experience where locals speak Irish as well as english. Great pints and removed from the real world.

5.The Cliffs Of Moher

Standing 214m (702 feet) at their highest point they stretch for 8 kilometres (5 miles) along the Atlantic coast of County Clare in the west of Ireland. From the Cliffs of Moher on a clear day one can see the Aran Islands and Galway Bay, as well as the Twelve Pins and the Maum Turk mountains in Connemara, Loop Head to the south and the Dingle Peninsula and Blasket Islands in Kerry. O’Brien’s Tower stands near the highest point and has served as a viewing point for visitors for hundreds of years.

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6.The Burren

The Burren (Irish: Boireann, meaning "great rock") is a karst landscape in County Clare, Ireland. It measures approximately 250 square kilometres and is enclosed roughly within the circle made by the villages of Ballyvaughan, Kinvara, Tubber, Corofin, Kilfenora and Lisdoonvarna.


Powerscourt Estate (Irish: Eastát Chúirt an Phaoraigh), located in Enniskerry, County Wicklow, Ireland, is a large country estate which is noted for its house and landscaped gardens, today occupying 19 hectares (47 acres).

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8.Gweedore - Donegal

It is the largest Irish-speaking parish in Ireland and known for it's wild and stunning beauty. The air doesn't get any fresher than it does here.


The perfect place in Cork to experience all that the county has to offer. Amazing food, great pubs, friendly people and a load of stuff to do on your doorstep.

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10.Achill Island

Achill Island in County Mayo is the largest island off the coast of Ireland. The island is 87% peat bog and it feels like stepping into old Ireland and a complete retreat from all the hustle and bustle.


Carlingford is a coastal town and townland in northern County Louth. It has great mountain walks, amazing sea views and friendly pubs and restaurants. Something for everybody here.

12.Boyne Valley

It was once known as the “Splendour” or “Joy” of Ireland and contributed to why Ireland is called “The Land of Saints and Scholars” – a town that contributed to keeping the light of learning alive in Europe during its Dark Ages.

13.The Giant's Causeway

This looks like something from another world and forms part of a spectacular coast in general. Because it is so far North not many Irish people have ever seen it.


Only a stone's throw from Dublin and one of the prettiest little fishing villages you'll find in the world. Lap up the seafood with a big creamy pint of Guinness while overlooking Dublin bay.

15.Sally Gap - Wicklow

Sally Gap is one of two east-to-west passes across the Wicklow Mountains. Sally Gaps is a cross-road that leads you North to Dublin, West to Blessington, South to Glendalough or East to Roundwood.

The Sally Gap got its road after the Irish rebellion of 1798. It was built by British Army forces looking to flush rebels from the hills, and to this day is known as the Military Road.

16.The River Shannon

The midlands don't always rank as one of the top Irish tourist destinations on wish lists but a boat trip down the Shannon taking in the loughs and slow pace of life is a must.


One of the most storied cities in the world over the last half century. It oozes history around every corner as well as the Titanic connection, great food and super friendly locals.

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